Writing a Support Letter: Support Letter Subject Ideas

We’ve established that it’s important to send your letter regularly. It’s also important that you don’t just send junk content.

You’re making the effort of sending your letter, putting it together and, if you mail it, paying for the supplies and postage to send it. So put in just a little more effort and make sure it’s worth sending.

Now, sometimes there are things you’ll want to tell your supporters—things you’re just bursting to put out there. But sometimes you won’t know what to say. So here are some subject ideas if you’re stuck.

1. Write a list. They’re easy to come up with, and they are fan favorites. Top ten reasons I love this city. The seven most-asked questions I get when I tell people what I do.

2. Tell us a story about a person you met this month who encouraged you in the work you’re doing.

3. Introduce your fellow staff members. Provide colorful details about each person to show what they’re like and what you appreciate about them. (This can be an encouragement to your coworkers, too!)

4. Talk about volunteers who help your organization. Maybe even interview them and ask why they want to help. This can be a new perspective on the work you’re a part of, and might connect with something in your readers.

5. Be a reporter for a week! Collect data. Conduct an interview with an expert. Research the local legislation. This is a great way to educate both yourself and your supporters on local issues. It could even be a useful piece for your organization to post on the website or in their print materials.

6. Bust out the color and use before-and-after photos of a project your organization has been working on.

7. Spend some time thinking about the next generation. If you work directly with kids, talk about how their lives are being influenced. No matter what kind of work you’re doing, it is affecting the world for the next generation. Tell us how.

8. What books have you read this year? Tell us about five that have made you think, and explain why.

9. Feature a community member in a “Day in the Life.” Obviously, you’ll need to ask that person’s permission to shadow them for a day. Take notes and—if it’s ok—film footage. This could be a really fun way for you to exercise your creative muscles as you put together both a short video and a written story to share with your supporters.

10. Check the local paper. Look for interesting topics that are affecting your city. You might not be thinking about them when you’re composing your newsletter, but local issues might be fascinating to your supporters, who may not know about what’s going on in your city or country.

What other subject ideas do you have?

  • Susie

    Thanks for these great ideas! I know I often get stuck on what I should write in my letter each month.